Book Discussion (Hybrid): The New Knowledge: Information, Data and the Remaking of Global Power (Rowman & Littlefield, 2023) by Blayne Haggart and Natasha Tusikov

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Join us for a Joint IUR-Urban Studies Seminars discussion of the book “The New Knowledge: Information, Data and the Remaking of Global Power” by Blayne Haggart and Natasha Tusikov.

The event is on February 12 from 13.15 to 15.00, and it’s hybrid: Location NIC0826, Link: https://mau-se.zoom.us/j/65473168451

Abstract 

We live in a datafied world. Whether it’s social media platforms hoovering up their users’ personal data to sell advertising, governments engaging in ever-more surveillance in the name of national security, companies like OpenAI scouring the internet to power its now-infamous generative AI chatbot, ChatGPT, or a government welfare department using data to deny (sometimes wrongfully) access to essential services, companies and governments are scrambling for more data, and more ways to use it. Throughout it all, we increasingly turn to tech companies and data experts to tell us how to design our cities, fight pandemics and live our lives, often with unfortunate results.

What are the consequences of this transformation into a knowledge-driven society? In The New Knowledge: Information, Data and the Remaking of Global Power (Rowman & Littlefield, 2023), political scientist Blayne Haggart and regulatory scholar Natasha Tusikovargue that more data doesn’t necessarily lead to a more enlightened or just society. Instead, it has concentrated power out of the hands of individual citizens and smaller countries and into the hands of a few companies and countries, while also reshaping basic concepts of property, ownership and control. And the global race to create and control data and intellectual property is leading us inexorably into a world of persistent surveillance by governments and companies. 

Blayne Haggart is an associate professor of political science at Brock University in St. Catharines, a Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation in Waterloo,and a Fellow at the Balsillie School of International Affairs at the University of Waterloo.

Natasha Tusikov is an associate professor in the Department of Social Science at York University, a research fellow with the Justice and Technoscience Lab (JusTech Lab), School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at the Australian National University, and a Fellow at the Balsillie School of International Affairs at the University of Waterloo.